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The Guided Fate Paradox Review

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Developer: Nippon Ichi Software
Publisher: NIS America
Genre: Role-Playing
Release Date: 28.10.2013
Official Site: http://nisamerica.com/games/guided_fate_paradox/
 
Imagine if God was walking among us here on Earth. Like, God is literally one of the people around you. That is the case in The Guided Fate Paradox. Renya Kagurazaka is your typical shy, mild-mannered, generic high school student, and he has been chosen to step into the shoes of God to answer prayers and guide fates. And there’s an overarching story about good vs. evil in there as well. 
 

The Guided Fate Paradox takes a long time to get rolling. The introduction is almost excruciatingly slow paced in setting up the plot, and building up the game’s characters. Once it does get on its way there are some interesting stories to uncover, and there is a lot of heart to the plot and the characters you meet. It’s a shame that the good bits don’t outweigh the many drawn out and tedious moments, ultimately culminating in a final showdown that leaves you with little payout after all the hard work you’ve put in.
 
The Guided Fate Paradox is a turn-based RPG that is played on a grid. Every exploratory move or attack you make counts as a turn. Once you have made a move, your AI partner makes one, and then the enemies. You fight your way through the randomly generated dungeons floor-by-floor, collecting equipment for Renya and his allies in order to gain access to new spells, attacks, and special abilities. The gameplay can be described as a roguelike JRPG romp that grinds away.
 
And oh how The Guided Fate Paradox grinds. In order to become stronger you need to level up your base stats across an intricate network of different systems. The game, however, does a poor job of properly explaining how to best balance your levelling up in order to emerge victorious. This requires you to put in a lot of mindless grinding in order to get stronger across the board. Enemy difficulty is awkwardly balanced throughout dungeons as well, as you’ll often slaughter foes with a single attack on the early floors of a dungeon, only to be blindsided by an enemy that does the same to you moments later. This is a shame, as The Guided Fate Paradox’s combat can be great fun at the rare times where you fight enemies that are at just the right difficulty. 
 
Once you finish the game a survival dungeon is unlocked. This dungeon has you start out from scratch and has you scrapping for survival. Both Renya and your enemies starts out at the same level and grow stronger along a similar curve. This provides a much more balanced difficulty than in the rest of the game. Smart players can also rise above their enemies by staying ahead of the curve, something that is lacking from the main game. It’s a shame that you need to spend anywhere between 35-45 hours on beating the game before unlocking this feature, as we found the survival dungeon to be where The Guided Fate Paradox’s combat and levelling systems shone through the best.
 
The Guided Fate Paradox is a lengthy game, with a goofy story, but plenty of heart. If you are the kind of player that enjoys really delving into and figuring out complex systems, rather than focusing on actual gameplay – this game should not disappoint. Unless you are heavily into this sort of game, The Guided Fate Paradox will present you with a long journey full of grinding and will leave you wanting more in return for the time you put into it. 
 

What's Good? Survival dungeons in where the game really shines, good voice acting, a lot of depth.

What's Bad? Much of the game's intricaies are badly explained, a lot of grinding, uneven difficulty curve in the main game.

 

 

Ingólfur Ólafsson

Managing Editor.

 

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